The Raving Theist

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Weird

September 17, 2005 | 20 Comments

From American Atheists:

An Atheist civil rights group today announced that it is pleased that Good Morning America host Bill Weir and the ABC television network will be making an on-air apology this weekend, retracting remarks aired on September 4, 2005.

In a news segment about the devastation in New Orleans, Mr. Weir stated: “There are no atheists in foxholes and hurricane zones.”

I don’t think what Mr. Weir said is really a slur on atheists. It’s more a slur on religion. The implication is that when people are scared out of their minds, they believe the kind of things that you have to be out of your mind to believe.

And so the idea behind this monument is misguided. The original clich

Comments

20 Responses to “Weird”

  1. The Uncredible Hallq
    September 17th, 2005 @ 8:01 pm

    A slur on who?

    A talk show host is forced to appologize for saying, “There are no atheists in foxholes and hurricane zones.” Raving Atheist looks at the situation this way: “It

  2. Stephen Caver
    September 17th, 2005 @ 9:17 pm

    I don’t see it. That seems more like taking a statement and twisting it around backwards to mean something else, to me.

  3. Sportin' Life
    September 17th, 2005 @ 9:22 pm

    I agree that the slogan doesn’t paint godbelief in a very good light, in its original usage, but a lot of people are probably not quite clever enough to figure that out.

    I had a post about Bill missing the whole point of the reference when he used it.

  4. Sportin' Life
    September 17th, 2005 @ 9:22 pm

    I agree that the slogan doesn’t paint godbelief in a very good light, in its original usage, but a lot of people are probably not quite clever enough to figure that out.

    I had a post about Bill missing the whole point of the reference when he used it.

  5. Sportin' Life
    September 17th, 2005 @ 9:22 pm

    I agree that the slogan doesn’t paint godbelief in a very good light, in its original usage, but a lot of people are probably not quite clever enough to figure that out.

    I had a post about Bill missing the whole point of the reference when he used it.

  6. Sportin' Life
    September 17th, 2005 @ 9:22 pm

    I agree that the slogan doesn’t paint godbelief in a very good light, in its original usage, but a lot of people are probably not quite clever enough to figure that out.

    I had a post about Bill missing the whole point of the reference when he used it.

  7. LucyMuff
    September 17th, 2005 @ 9:28 pm

    what the men be saying is that atheist are big phonies and when they be scared to pooh in their pants they can’t keep up phoney lies any more and will admits that JESUS is lord and they want HIS help. It be like when you talks big about kicking ass but then when Mr T comes to ounch you yous is all scared and begs Mr T not to kick you ass.

  8. Baconeatingatheistjew
    September 17th, 2005 @ 10:06 pm

    Here is what I put in as a comment for the Jews in foxholes blurb:

    I read a stat that stated that 50% of women in the Army are black. That would mean white America is under represented. It is also true that blacks and Hispanic Americans are very much over represented in the Army as far as males go.

    Bottom line, look no farther than socio economic reasons to be the main reasons Jews are under represented. There is no draft, and the Army offers a great place for discipline and gratis education.

  9. Mookie
    September 18th, 2005 @ 4:42 am

    LucyMuff, what is it? How much does it cost? And how much of it do you take? How are you able to type after being dosed up?

  10. a different tim
    September 18th, 2005 @ 10:02 am

    Does this mean Mr T is the son of God?

    In a strange sort of way, I can see that…..

  11. Xianghong
    September 18th, 2005 @ 10:59 am

    There are no gays in closets.

  12. Aeger
    September 18th, 2005 @ 6:22 pm

    “That being said, there are no Quakers in foxholes.”

    Is that a subtle joke that passed me by? Cause if you’re serious, I’d like an explanation as to why there are no Quakers in foxholes. Quakers would probably be the best in fox holes, they wouldn’t freak out, and they’d sit in peaceful protest until they were let out of the foxhole.

    I have the highest respect for Quakerism, and I would appreciate it if you would refrian from insulting it.

  13. Mikel
    September 18th, 2005 @ 7:08 pm

    Nice twist on the “no atheists in foxholes” comment. I’ll have to remember that as a retort if someone ever throws the line at me.

    BTW, the thing about no Quakers in foxholes is refering to Quakers being pacifists, conscientious objectors, and therefore unlikely to fight in a war.

  14. Jean-Paul Fastidious
    September 18th, 2005 @ 8:35 pm

    “There are no atheists in foxholes” is just one example of the common phenomenon among the religious to say that atheists deep down really believe in God but that they deny him (knowingly even) out of fear/hate/desire-to-disobey-God’s-rules, and that when push comes to shove they will admit it (e.g. on their deathbed).

    It’s easier to propose that those who disagree with you suffer from some sort of psychosis that keeps them from admitting they really actually truly agree with you than it is to deal with the substance of their disagreement, especially when that substance is based on the lack of any substance to your belief. It’s a wonderful rhetorical tactic: to deny your opponent the authenticity of their own words, or even thoughts, is a great way to dismiss anything they have to say (or even lay the groundwork for having them committed). Atheists, by this view, are necessarily either liars or insane.

    Another silly example of this phenomenon is looking for any use by an atheist of any custom or phrase that has religious origins or is associated with religion in any tenuous way and claiming that use as evidence of the atheist’s deep-seated God belief, as opposed to simple social custom. For instance, if an atheist says “dammit!” then clearly he, deep down, believes in God. (Conversely, a Christian saying “Thursday” would never be evidence he’s really a Norse pagan.)

    A recent, topical example: in a post last week on his website (cross-posted to many Christian sites), Dr. Warren Throckmorton, PhD, subtly infers that because Michael Newdow, who “avows to be” an atheist (as opposed to “is”), said he was “thankful”, that that means he secretly believes in the God he is trying to take away from the helpless little school children. It’s not surprising that this article spread in the Christosphere, since the our-opponents-really-know-we’re-right argument is a refereshing sip of flattery in a sea of ontological disappointment.

    Another more perverse version of this is claiming the very fact that an atheist is talking about God (or more likely, about people who believe in God and what they believe about him) proves that he’s a believer. See for example this quote from “pee cee” in the comments yesterday: “You athiests sure talk a lot about a God you don’t believe in” (the clear implication is that you atheists really do believe he exists.)

    This last version gets even more twisted when it is used as positive evidence that God exists (“The Argument from Interest” according to this.)

    But, of course, the theists who make these sorts of arguments don’t really believe them. They just fear/hate atheists and are in denial of there being no God, which, deep down, they know to be true.

  15. Dick Durata
    September 19th, 2005 @ 3:28 am

    There’s a lot of shit in foxholes.

  16. leon
    September 19th, 2005 @ 11:56 am

    In other words, Raving Atheist, there is nothing in a hole.

    However, if it is a foxhole there must be a fox in it.

    A better idea:
    Eliminate the cause for the need of foxholes.

  17. jahrta
    September 19th, 2005 @ 1:44 pm

    there seems to be no dearth of dead theists in foxholes these days. Actually, most of them seem to be dying in their humvee’s. if you can refuse service in the armed forces based upon religious reasons or because you are a pacifist, can you also have refused to fight in a war because you’re an atheist, and believe that this is the only shot you’ll have at any type of existence, making it more valuable than it otherwise would have been had you any belief in the afterlife?

  18. Thorndog
    September 20th, 2005 @ 10:30 am

    There are probably few unrepentant backsliders in foxholes,
    but many atheists are BORN in foxholes!

  19. markm
    September 20th, 2005 @ 6:26 pm

    Another twist on “there are no Quakers in foxholes”: Alvin York was a religious pacifist who was drafted in WWI because his church didn’t get the recognition given to the Quakers. He changed his mind about pacifism when the German machine guns started cutting down his buddies – that day he killed over 20 men, knocked out the machine guns, and with the survivors of his section, took over 100 prisoners.

  20. saratoga
    October 13th, 2005 @ 11:15 am

    While your point is valid, the facts you state are inacccurate. He killed only 9 men and was not proud about it.

    But, no doubt it’s an interesting topic. You can read more about the man. here:

    http://www.alvincyork.org/AlvinCullomYork.htm

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